Blue Card for Children Germany: Requirements and Benefits

Understanding the Blue Card for Children in Germany

If you are a child in Germany, you may have heard about the Blue Card. The Blue Card is a type of visa that allows skilled workers from non-European Union countries to work and live in Germany. It was introduced in 2012 to attract highly qualified professionals to Germany.

But what does the Blue Card mean for you as a child in Germany? Well, it may not have a direct impact on your life, but it can affect your family. If one of your parents is a skilled worker from a non-EU country, they may be eligible for the Blue Card. This means that they can work and live in Germany, which can provide more stability for your family.

It is important to note that the Blue Card is not just handed out to anyone. To be eligible, a person must have a university degree or equivalent qualification and a job offer with a salary of at least €56,800 per year (as of 2023). This means that the people who receive the Blue Card are highly skilled and can contribute to the German economy.

Overall, the Blue Card is a way for Germany to attract skilled workers from non-EU countries and provide more stability for families. While it may not directly impact you as a child in Germany, it can benefit your family and the country as a whole.

Eligibility Criteria

To be eligible for a Blue Card in Germany, you must meet certain academic and employment requirements. These requirements are designed to ensure that only highly skilled migrants are admitted to the country.

Academic Qualifications

To be eligible for a Blue Card, you must have a university degree or a higher education degree that is equivalent to a German university degree. The degree must be relevant to the job you have been offered. Your degree will be assessed to ensure that it meets the necessary standards.

Employment Requirements

To be eligible for a Blue Card, you must have a job offer from a German employer that meets certain requirements. The job must be in a field that has a shortage of qualified workers. You must also be able to demonstrate that you will earn a gross annual salary of at least €56,800. If you work in a shortage occupation, the minimum salary requirement is €44,304.

Your employment contract must be for a minimum of one year. If you are self-employed, you must provide evidence that your business will benefit the German economy.

It is important to note that the Blue Card is tied to your employer. If you change jobs, you will need to apply for a new Blue Card. However, if you have been employed in Germany for at least two years, you may be eligible for a permanent residence permit.

In conclusion, the eligibility criteria for a Blue Card in Germany are strict, but they are designed to ensure that only highly skilled migrants are admitted to the country. If you meet the requirements, the Blue Card can be a valuable tool for building a successful career in Germany.

Application Process

If you are a non-EU citizen and want to apply for a Blue Card for your child in Germany, you need to follow a specific application process. This section will guide you through the required documents and the visa application process.

Required Documents

To apply for a Blue Card for your child in Germany, you will need to provide the following documents:

  • A completed application form
  • A valid passport
  • A biometric picture of your child
  • A birth certificate of your child
  • Proof of your child’s health insurance
  • Proof of your child’s educational qualifications, such as a school certificate or university degree

You may also need to provide additional documents, depending on your child’s specific situation. For example, if your child is under 18 and traveling alone, you may need to provide a letter of consent from the child’s parents or legal guardians.

Visa Application

Once you have gathered all the required documents, you will need to submit your application at the German embassy or consulate in your home country. You will need to make an appointment beforehand and bring all the documents with you. During the appointment, you will need to provide biometric data, such as fingerprints.

After submitting your application, the embassy will forward it to the relevant authorities in Germany for processing. The processing time can vary depending on the workload of the authorities, but it usually takes around three months.

Once a decision has been made on your child’s application, you will be notified by the embassy. If your application is approved, you will receive an entry visa, which allows your child to enter Germany and apply for the Blue Card. If your application is rejected, you will receive a written order explaining the reasons for the decision.

Overall, the application process for a Blue Card for your child in Germany can be complex and involve a lot of bureaucracy. However, by following the required steps and providing all the necessary documents, you can increase your chances of a successful application.

Benefits of the Blue Card

If you are a highly skilled worker and wish to work and live in Germany with your family, the Blue Card may be a great option for you. Here are some of the benefits of the Blue Card:

Residence and Settlement Privileges

The Blue Card is a residence permit that allows you to work and live in Germany for a period of up to four years. During this time, you can travel freely within the Schengen area. After living in Germany for two years, you can apply for a settlement permit, which allows you to stay in Germany indefinitely and gives you the right to work in any profession you wish.

Family Reunification

One of the benefits of the Blue Card is that it allows your family members to join you in Germany. Your spouse and minor children can apply for a German residence permit at the same time as you or join you later. Your spouse is also allowed to work in Germany without restrictions. Moreover, after living in Germany for two years, your family members can apply for a settlement permit as well.

In addition to these benefits, the Blue Card also allows you to enjoy other rights and privileges, such as:

  • Access to social security benefits
  • Access to education and training opportunities
  • The right to join a trade union
  • The right to vote in local elections

Overall, the Blue Card is an excellent option for highly skilled workers who wish to work and live in Germany with their families. It provides a range of benefits and privileges that make it easier for you to settle and integrate into German society.

Employment Opportunities

If you are a highly skilled migrant with a Blue Card in Germany, you will have access to a range of employment opportunities. In this section, we will explore some of the job portals and occupational fields that may be of interest to you.

Job Portals

There are several job portals that you can use to search for job openings in Germany. Some of the most popular ones include:

  • Euraxess.de: This job portal is specifically designed for researchers and academics. It offers a range of job opportunities in science, engineering, mathematics, medicine, architecture, and more.

  • Academics.com: This job portal is targeted towards academics and researchers. It offers job opportunities in various fields, including science, engineering, mathematics, and medicine.

  • Alumniportal-Deutschland.org: This job portal is designed for professionals who have studied in Germany. It offers job opportunities in various fields, including teaching, engineering, architecture, and more.

Occupational Fields

As a Blue Card holder, you will have access to a range of occupational fields in Germany. Some of the most popular ones include:

  • Science and Engineering: Germany is known for its strong science and engineering industries. As a highly skilled migrant with a background in these fields, you may find many job opportunities in research and development, as well as in the private sector.

  • Mathematics: Germany is also known for its strong mathematics industry. As a highly skilled migrant with a background in mathematics, you may find many job opportunities in finance, insurance, and technology.

  • Medicine: Germany has a strong healthcare system, and as a highly skilled migrant with a background in medicine, you may find many job opportunities in hospitals, clinics, and research institutions.

  • Architecture and Design: Germany is known for its innovative architecture and design industries. As a highly skilled migrant with a background in these fields, you may find many job opportunities in architecture firms, design studios, and more.

  • Teaching: Germany has a strong education system, and as a highly skilled migrant with a background in teaching, you may find many job opportunities in schools, universities, and other educational institutions.

In conclusion, as a highly skilled migrant with a Blue Card in Germany, you will have access to a range of employment opportunities in various occupational fields. By using job portals and exploring different industries, you can find the right job that matches your skills and experience.

Healthcare and Insurance

Health Insurance

As a child of a Blue Card holder in Germany, you are eligible for public health insurance. The German health insurance system is divided into two categories: statutory and private. Statutory health insurance is mandatory for employees with an income below a certain threshold, while private health insurance is available for those with a higher income. As a child, you are covered under your parent’s health insurance plan until you reach the age of 18. After that, you can either continue to be covered under your parent’s plan or obtain your own health insurance.

In Germany, the electronic health card (eGK) is used to access healthcare services. The eGK contains your personal information, including your name, address, and insurance information. It is important to carry your eGK with you at all times, as you will need it to access healthcare services.

Healthcare Services

As a child of a Blue Card holder, you are entitled to the same healthcare services as German citizens. The German healthcare system is known for its high quality and accessibility. You can choose from a wide range of healthcare providers, including doctors, hospitals, and specialists.

In Germany, healthcare services are provided on a fee-for-service basis. This means that you will be charged for each service that you receive. However, most healthcare services are covered by your health insurance plan. It is important to note that some services, such as dental care, may not be fully covered by your health insurance plan.

If you require medical attention, you can visit a doctor or hospital without an appointment. However, if you need to see a specialist, you will need a referral from your primary care physician. In addition to traditional healthcare services, Germany also offers alternative medicine options, such as acupuncture and homeopathy.

In conclusion, as a child of a Blue Card holder in Germany, you are entitled to public health insurance and high-quality healthcare services. It is important to carry your electronic health card with you at all times and to understand the healthcare system in order to receive the best possible care.

Immigration Law

If you are a parent with a Blue Card in Germany, it is important to be aware of the legal aspects of your child’s status in the country. The Residence Act is the main law governing immigration in Germany, and it includes provisions for family reunification, which allows spouses and children under the age of 18 to join the Blue Card holder in Germany.

It is important to note that children who are born in Germany to Blue Card holders are automatically granted German citizenship. Additionally, children who are born outside of Germany and who are under the age of 18 can apply for a dependent visa to join their parents in Germany.

If you have any questions or concerns about your child’s immigration status in Germany, it is recommended that you consult with an immigration lawyer who can provide you with legal advice and guidance.

Government Agencies

There are several government agencies that are involved in the process of obtaining and maintaining a Blue Card in Germany. The Federal Employment Agency is responsible for issuing the Blue Card, while the Ausländerbehörde (foreigners’ registration office) is responsible for processing residence permits and visas for non-German citizens.

If you are a parent with a Blue Card in Germany and you have school-aged children, it is important to be aware of the Central Office for Foreign Education (ZAB), which is responsible for evaluating foreign educational credentials. This agency can help you determine whether your child’s educational qualifications meet the standards required for admission to German schools.

Finally, the Bundesamt für Migration und Flüchtlinge (BAMF) is the federal agency responsible for processing asylum applications and providing support to refugees and immigrants in Germany. If you have any questions or concerns about your child’s status in Germany, you can contact BAMF for assistance.

Overall, it is important to stay informed about the legal aspects of your child’s status in Germany as a Blue Card holder. By working with the appropriate government agencies and seeking legal advice when necessary, you can ensure that your child’s rights are protected and that they have access to the educational and social opportunities available in Germany.

International Comparisons

When it comes to the Blue Card for children in Germany, it’s worth looking at how other countries handle similar situations. Here is a brief overview of how the Blue Card compares to other countries’ work and residency programs.

Blue Card in Other Countries

The EU Blue Card is a work and residency permit that allows highly skilled non-EU citizens to work and live in most EU countries, including Germany. However, not all EU countries have adopted the Blue Card. For example, Ireland and the United Kingdom do not have a Blue Card program. Northern Ireland, which is part of the UK, does have a similar program called the Skilled Worker Visa.

Outside of the EU, other countries have their own work and residency programs. Canada, Australia, and New Zealand all have points-based systems that prioritize highly skilled workers. Israel and Japan have similar programs that are focused on highly skilled workers in specific industries. South Korea has a similar program that is open to highly skilled workers in a variety of industries.

The United States of America has several work and residency programs, including the H-1B visa for highly skilled workers and the EB-1 visa for individuals with extraordinary abilities in their field. However, these programs are highly competitive, and the application process can be lengthy and complex.

Overall, while there are similarities between the Blue Card and other work and residency programs, each country has its own unique system. It’s important to research and understand the requirements and application process for each program before making a decision.

Scroll to Top